Paint code

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Martin
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Location: Wateringbury, Kent, UK

Paint code

Post by Martin » Mon Nov 13, 2017 7:06 pm

Does anybody have the paint code for opalescent silver grey as used on 1966 V8 or know where I can find it please? Is there a recommended supplier for paint?
Thanks, Martin

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theoldman
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Location: Bacton on Sea, Norfolk UK

Re: Paint code

Post by theoldman » Mon Nov 13, 2017 9:53 pm

I always use Jawel in Birmingham. If you phone them up, they will tell you what the code is (in an effort to sell you some paint/thinners/masking tape/tack rags and so on!!)

Neil
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tjt77
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Re: Paint code

Post by tjt77 » Tue Nov 14, 2017 2:51 am

Unable to answer the question regarding paint code (most older paint stores in my area still have paint chip and code books dating back to 1960s.. but they dont always have the 'formula' to convert that code to currently available paints) But I do have a question as to what TYPE of paints are available today in UK . Im told that its mostly 'water based' today.
Here in calfornia, there are limitations as regards types of paint that can be used by a professional repair shops. And what paint supply stores can supply for 'automotive' application. heres what I can find easily :- synthetic enamel (which is the paint used by jaguar daimler post '60 ..so would be on 'our' cars) such as Dupont 'centari' .. A more durable paint is 'single stage' urethane.. still readily available.. then there is 'base clear' which is the most commonly used paint by modern repair facilities..generally urethane for the 'clearcoat' an finally 'water based' paint, which I believe is the 'standard' in UK and N Europe.
My preferred paint for self application is 'nitro- cellulose', also known as 'cellulose lacquer' , which I order from another of state.. (I believe my suppler gets it from UK) as with here.. cellulose lacquer is still in use in the furniture and guitar making industries..although here the more common 'laquer' is 'acrylic lacquer'... very similar to cellulose.. but with much faster drying time, slightly harder on surface, and not quite as durable in long term..this was also available in Uk when i lived there.. it was the most commonly used paint for car body repairs here until mid 1970s..
when using the paint locally available I simply take in the fuel door lid and have them mix the paint to match the colour of the sample presented.. some colors match closely with common, readily available colors available here.. for instance, BMC "old english white' is almost identical to Ford 'wimbledon white'..

Martin
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Location: Wateringbury, Kent, UK

Re: Paint code

Post by Martin » Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:32 pm

Thanks for replies on 'paint code'
I've only small patches of rust and body finishing / paint finishing is not in my skill set. I used to do it myself in my youth and on 'old bangers' but don't want to attempt it on the opalescent silver grey so have a quote from a mobile sprayer but wants to use a 'water based' paint rather than the solvent based I'm more familiar with ( but still needs paint code) I have sourced a small touch up bottle of solvent based that's a good match but v. difficult to talk to them. I'll try the route theoldman suggested but any comments / experience of water based product on top of conventional product please?
Rgds, Martin

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theoldman
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Re: Paint code

Post by theoldman » Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:58 pm

You shouldn't get a reaction from water based paints, but as if you feel "belt and braces" is the way to go, give it a coat of "Barcoat" prior to applying the primer.
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simonp
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Location: Birmingham

Re: Paint code

Post by simonp » Tue Nov 14, 2017 11:14 pm

I have that colour on my Daimler SP250.

The colour code that I have recorded is 2300M or ICI colour M073 2300

Silver Grey

I wrote this down a long time ago when the car was last repainted by Ray Jensen.

Simonp
Last edited by simonp on Wed Nov 15, 2017 4:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Daimler SP 250 - "To feel its eager response as you open up is to know a new motoring adventure"(Sales brochure) The adventure continues!

Martin
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Location: Wateringbury, Kent, UK

Re: Paint code

Post by Martin » Wed Nov 15, 2017 3:16 pm

Thanks Simonp and previous respondents
Kind regards
Martin

Dragon
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Re: Paint code

Post by Dragon » Thu Nov 16, 2017 12:29 pm

Hi Martin and everyone with steel cars,
In the dry climate of California, the use of cellulose paints can be acceptable, BUT in the wet climate of UK it is NOT!
If you are old enough, you will remember that new steel cars started showing rust before they were 5 years old; this was because the makers were using cellulose paints. Cellulose absorbs water and holds it next to the steel, promoting rusting!
It was not until modern two-pack paints, such as Polyurethane (PU) and Acrylic, that rusting stopped being normal.
Please use anything except cellulose on steel cars!
Wilf,
SP250 104008, Herefordshire.

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Vortex O'Plinth
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Re: Paint code

Post by Vortex O'Plinth » Thu Nov 16, 2017 1:35 pm

Dragon wrote:
Thu Nov 16, 2017 12:29 pm
Hi Martin and everyone with steel cars,
In the dry climate of California, the use of cellulose paints can be acceptable, BUT in the wet climate of UK it is NOT!
If you are old enough, you will remember that new steel cars started showing rust before they were 5 years old; this was because the makers were using cellulose paints. Cellulose absorbs water and holds it next to the steel, promoting rusting!
It was not until modern two-pack paints, such as Polyurethane (PU) and Acrylic, that rusting stopped being normal.
Please use anything except cellulose on steel cars!
You have a valid point Wilf, and certainly cellulose product applied over etch primer was not entirely waterproof. However the epoxy primers available nowadays provide an impermeable base for any type of paint system. Cellulose is still useful, since it can be legally used on Classic and Vintage cars by the DIY home sprayer, whereas the 2 pack isocyanate paints cannot.
Nick

Phillmore
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Re: Paint code

Post by Phillmore » Thu Nov 16, 2017 5:45 pm

So how waterproof are the modern water based paints?
Andy

1954 Conquest Mk1, 1956 Conquest Mk2, 1957 Conquest Century Mk2, 1955 Austin A90 Westminster

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