Camber angle

BARRY COPE
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Joined: Tue Apr 19, 2016 5:58 pm

Camber angle

Post by BARRY COPE » Sun Jul 08, 2018 10:32 am

The chassis on my SP250 has had some major repairs in the past, including the re-building of one of the front suspension towers.
I am suffering uneven tyre wear. I have had the tracking checked and that os ok.
I suspect that when the chassis was repaired the correct number of shims were not replaced under the lower wishbone mounting.
How can i measure the camber and what sort of equipment might i need ?

Cheers

Barry

bakergh
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Location: New Forest, Hampshire

Re: Camber angle

Post by bakergh » Sun Jul 08, 2018 10:45 am

I would take the SP to a tyre replacement company with the correct equipment for measuring all the steering angles.
They will produce a report with all the angles as measured. You should then be able to work out where and how may shims you require to adjust for the correct angles. I cannot recommend a particular tyre company as most of the better ones are local independents.


Graham

Warsash 2
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Re: Camber angle

Post by Warsash 2 » Sun Jul 08, 2018 11:22 am

Hi Barry
You might wish to try Tyre City. The local one at Segensworth just off the M27 away seem very professional when I have used them. It might be worth giving them a ring to see if they can do shims.
Regards

Colin

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Vortex O'Plinth
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Location: Gloucestershire

Re: Camber angle

Post by Vortex O'Plinth » Sun Jul 08, 2018 1:49 pm

You can check the camber yourself using a Gunson camber gauge. Check this video from 1.54 to 2.50.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-yiJpe1sIA

The Gunson is around £30 from several suppliers or there's this cheapo version from Amazon.

One degree of camber equates to approx. 4.5mm of shims under the lower wishbone.
Nick

Pas d'elle yeux Rhône que nous.

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Marc Mears
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Re: Camber angle

Post by Marc Mears » Wed Jul 11, 2018 12:53 pm

I used the Gunson - and it’s a great little thing - placed it on the disk - not the wheel to get a more accurate reading ... picture shows how many shims I had to put in!!! it had none.

I have run it now for 3 or 4 years and done 3000 miles and the tyres are all wearing even....

Also, if I remember correctly (I guess someone will confirm) but as the car used to run on Cross ply’s originally, the set up for Radials tyres require a little more positive camber and I think I set it at 1 degree…. So long ago I forget these things!

marc
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Jez
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Re: Camber angle

Post by Jez » Wed Jul 11, 2018 5:47 pm

My SP250 was set up with 2 degrees positive camber (i.e. wheels wider apart at the top), which was factory setting, tuned I assume for crossplies. I believe radials prefer a more neutral, or with many modern cars negative camber, set up. Hence I fitted an 8mm (from memory) steel shim on each side which achieved closed to zero camber.
The front end is fairly stable now under cornering and no tyre wear issues. If anything, it is the rear which feels a bit loose - maybe new bushing etc required but a job for another day.

Cheers - Jez
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Paulkennedy
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Re: Camber angle

Post by Paulkennedy » Fri Jul 13, 2018 4:04 pm

I have purchased the Gunson and it is reading 3' positive N/S and 1' positive O/S. My question is should it be possible to make up some split shims and undoing slightly the lower wishbone bolts slide the shims in from either side of each bolt. I am trying to avoid having to dismantle the suspension.
Paul

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Vortex O'Plinth
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Location: Gloucestershire

Re: Camber angle

Post by Vortex O'Plinth » Fri Jul 13, 2018 4:54 pm

Paulkennedy wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 4:04 pm
I have purchased the Gunson and it is reading 3' positive N/S and 1' positive O/S. My question is should it be possible to make up some split shims and undoing slightly the lower wishbone bolts slide the shims in from either side of each bolt. I am trying to avoid having to dismantle the suspension.
Paul
Just to ask the obvious - I assume you ensured the car was on perfectly horizontal ground before checking the camber? A one degree slope would account for your difference in readings.

In theory you could do as you suggest; standard shims slotted to allow them to slide past the bolts should work. Obviously take care slackening the wishbone bracket bolts; with the car jacked up and the suspension resting on the rebound stop it should be pretty safe.
Nick

Pas d'elle yeux Rhône que nous.

Paulkennedy
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Re: Camber angle

Post by Paulkennedy » Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:22 pm

Thanks for your reply Nick, I attached the Gunson to the discs, having the car jacked up. I hadn't considered a not level floor, I will check that. Another thought, should I place a jack separately under each spring pan and then raise each side to the height as if it had its wheel on, I hope that makes sense.
Paul

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Vortex O'Plinth
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Re: Camber angle

Post by Vortex O'Plinth » Fri Jul 13, 2018 11:32 pm

Paulkennedy wrote:
Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:22 pm
.... Another thought, should I place a jack separately under each spring pan and then raise each side to the height as if it had its wheel on, I hope that makes sense.
Paul
If using the Gunson on the brake disc, that is certainly the most accurate way - assuming the axis joining the two wheel hubs can be maintained horizontal.

Although taking the reading from the disc is potentially more accurate, I prefer to have the car with the wheels on and on level ground and, since I have wire wheels, using the bar across the wheel rim as shown in the video above at 2.40. To eliminate any error due to wheel deformation, after the first reading I roll the car to rotate the wheel 180° and take it again. If there's any difference, take the average.

A pretty accurate DIY method can be done if the car has the front suspension largely stripped down - and the body removed!! - see here. Best result will be achieved if the wishbone bushes are polyurethane since the true camber will be under load when rubber bushes can be significantly deformed.
Nick

Pas d'elle yeux Rhône que nous.

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