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Aluminium protection

Magnor
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2016 7:31 pm
Location: Bampton, Devon

Aluminium protection

Post by Magnor » Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:27 pm

Anyone know of a method to slow the dulling of polished aluminium (rocker covers)? I have been told applying bee's wax is good, has anyone tried it?
Clive

Phillmore
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Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2016 1:25 pm
Location: Worcestershire Herefordshire border

Re: Aluminium protection

Post by Phillmore » Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:22 am

At what temperature does beeswax melt I wonder?
Andy

1954 Conquest Mk1, 1956 Conquest Mk2, 1957 Conquest Century Mk2, 1955 Austin A90 Westminster

Christopher Storey
Posts: 255
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 6:40 pm
Location: Cheshire

Re: Aluminium protection

Post by Christopher Storey » Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:07 am

I have started using ACF 50 . Available in a low pressure aerosol ; it's really an aviation orientated product and thus quite expensive at about £13 , but it really does work , sprayed on and then smeared around with a rag . Best stuff I have ever come across, and it 's also useful as a general corrosion protectant

Magnor
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Feb 28, 2016 7:31 pm
Location: Bampton, Devon

Re: Aluminium protection

Post by Magnor » Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:19 am

Good point about melting point of bees wax. I wondered if it would turn sticky after some time.
ACF 50 looks interesting. I assume it is similar to WD40 which I have tried but has little effect on holding back dulling.

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John-B
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Re: Aluminium protection

Post by John-B » Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:28 pm

Phillmore wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:22 am
At what temperature does beeswax melt I wonder?
Aren't you supposed to polish it off?

classiclife
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Re: Aluminium protection

Post by classiclife » Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:35 pm

Magnor wrote:
Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:19 am
Good point about melting point of bees wax. I wondered if it would turn sticky after some time.
ACF 50 looks interesting. I assume it is similar to WD40 which I have tried but has little effect on holding back dulling.
WD40 is a water dispersant, as such its chemical properties will be different hence not useful with aluminium. In addition, that is why WD40 is useless as a rust buster - whereas Plus Gas etc is purpose made. It really is "horses for courses".

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Richard.
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Bud
Posts: 222
Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:06 pm

Re: Aluminium protection

Post by Bud » Tue Feb 12, 2019 3:16 pm

Well I would polish and buff all your aluminum for the LAST time and take it to your local powder coating facility and have the items clear coated twice and NEVER POLISH AGAIN.
A hose off and sparkle plenty returns every time. Just make sure you take all your similar items in at the same time as the vendor usually only puts like items in the oven at the same time so a small job can be squeezed in on someones space.
And you would save bunches on your bersitis meds.

tjt77
Posts: 491
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2016 7:01 pm

Re: Aluminium protection

Post by tjt77 » Wed Feb 13, 2019 3:16 am

alloy that was initially polished, can be buffed up to its original finish and beyond with standard metal polish.. there are also proprietary sealers for alloy sold as 'polish' that work well. Any 'finish coating' (such as clear urethane or clear powder coat) will eventually fail .. initially a chip or scratch which allow the elements to penetrate and work their way under the coating..eventually it goes opaque, and its serious work to remove it once comprimised..each to their own, but the natural polished alloy tends to look the most authentic and requires little maintenance. The covers can be polished up in situ in less than 10 mins per side if they are already in good shape but slightly dull with virtually ANY metal polish .. look into the resin based metal sealing polishes for best long term results. (If they are corroded and pitted you can either removed them and hand sand the marks out with various grades of abrasive, I start with 80 grit and work to smooth with 100 grit and water then finish with 600 before machine buffing...OR you can send them out to a metal polisher and have them do the work) then finish with a sealing polish designed for metal after installation... I used to use a product called 'TR3 resin glaze' and it was particularly good at sealing polished alloy components that were exposed to the elements for at least 12 months..no longer available, but Im sure there is something comparable available from car care product retailers.

timmartin
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2016 1:37 pm
Location: Berkshire

Re: Aluminium protection

Post by timmartin » Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:29 am

Looks like good advice.
What about clear anodising? Same issues as other coatings?
Tim
Blue 1964 SP250 in Berkshire

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Vortex O'Plinth
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Location: Gloucestershire

Re: Aluminium protection

Post by Vortex O'Plinth » Wed Feb 13, 2019 12:03 pm

timmartin wrote:
Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:29 am
Looks like good advice.
What about clear anodising? Same issues as other coatings?
To be pedantic, clear anodising is not strictly a coating; it's an electrolytic process that increases and hardens the natural oxide layer on the surface of aluminium, Typically it's only a couple of microns thick. Bright dipping after polishing and before anodising can achieve a permanent fairly polished appearance on aluminium and it's alloys. The anodised surface has a much lower coefficient of thermal expansion than the substrate so temperature cycling ( as found in rocker covers for example) can cause cracking. It won't peel off though. Additionally, cast aluminium (as in rocker covers for example) has a more complex structure than pure aluminium is not usually a good base for anodising.
Nick

"Open the pod bay door Hal".

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