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Brake Warning Light: V8-250

Christopher Storey
Posts: 261
Joined: Wed Mar 16, 2016 6:40 pm
Location: Cheshire

Re: Brake Warning Light: V8-250

Post by Christopher Storey » Wed Nov 28, 2018 4:25 pm

Syd. IIRC the float is contained wholly within the alloy cylinder which is attached to the screwtop lid, so a cork one cannot escape even if it disintegrates - it may indeed be what has happened to cause this problem

Clive
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat May 12, 2018 2:09 am
Location: Phoenix, USA

Re: Brake Warning Light: V8-250

Post by Clive » Thu Nov 29, 2018 3:17 am

Hi Syd,

I checked - and I did use the plastic one. Seems to be in pristine condition still - even the print on it is intact. I guess I changed it more than 5 years ago - I remember posting on the old forum about it.

Regards,
Clive.

Sydsmith
Posts: 823
Joined: Sun Feb 14, 2016 11:15 pm
Location: Aberystwyth Wales

Re: Brake Warning Light: V8-250

Post by Sydsmith » Thu Nov 29, 2018 11:17 am

That's good to hear Clive, can't be too careful with brakes, especially with such a heavy car. S

classiclife
Posts: 450
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:55 am
Location: Ridgewood - East Sussex
Contact:

Re: Brake Warning Light: V8-250

Post by classiclife » Mon Jan 28, 2019 3:18 pm

Hello,

Thought I would update the thread with an end result, as it may prove useful to another owner who finds themselves in the same position I was.

I did purchase a replacement new "modern alternative" from DMG, but found there were a number of issues with it - as such returned it for a refund; it may have been the case that I had a dud item but to be honest that really spurred me on to overhaul the original Daimler item. A wise financial decision in the end.

The aluminium cylinder, within the brake fluid reservoir that houses the cork, is removed by a simple downward twist movement. This exposes the waterlogged float. A tiny shaped washer is used at the bottom of the needle that goes through the cork - I presume to stop it moving downwards / hold in place.

With the washer easily removed it is a simple process of pulling the old float off the needle - I should add that my old float was a cork, but I am uncertain if it is the original or a later repair.

I used a white wine cork of natural material, which needed trimming by 1/2" to match the length of the old float. The needle thickness is just over 2mm and therefore I drilled the new cork centrally using a 2mm drill bit - this ensures the needle has an interference fit against the cork. The new cork is then pushed on to the needle up to the barb located on the needle. With the cork correctly positioned, the shaped washer is then refitted.

The needle and float assembly are now complete; the final task is to push the aluminium housing back on to the cap which is the opposite of removal. With the attachment secure you need to check the cork moves freely in the housing - a simple turning upside down a few times is sufficient.

If that passes the test then the completed assembly can be lowered slowly in to the brake fluid reservoir ensuring the brake fluid does not get too close to the top due to displacement. With the cap securely fitted, reconnect the terminals (not polarity sensitive) and then test to ensure the brake warning light works as it should.

Other than a bit of time, the repair cost nothing as the local pub gave me a cork.

Oh yes, ensure you protect your paintwork when carrying out this task - obvious I know, but sometimes overlooked.

Hope the above will be of assistance if required.

Regards.

Richard.
1968 Daimler V8-250 Saloon
DLOC East Sussex Area Representative.

Southern Classics Society Events Co-ordinator.
www.southernclassics.org.uk

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