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Daimler 15 camshaft

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bop
Posts: 88
Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 3:26 am
Location: Alberta Canada

Daimler 15 camshaft

Post by bop » Wed Jan 30, 2019 5:20 pm

Hi,
Another question with regards to Daimler 15 camshaft. Does anyone know the purpose of the insert piece (arrow) on the rear camshaft bearing surface and what it is called?
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thanks Bob

Stan Thomas
Posts: 466
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2016 2:14 pm
Location: Penkridge. Staffs.

Re: Daimler 15 camshaft

Post by Stan Thomas » Thu Jan 31, 2019 9:35 am

What is the insert made of, is it phosphor bronze, is there a pressurised oil feed to the journal - and is it a loose (or even spring loaded) or a permanent fixture?

Bear in mind Daimler were a bit of a law unto themselves when it came to wierd and wonderful ideas, and I'm convinced they most likely had board meetings to decide the most complex way of doing things. If they had sex in a canoe they would probably do it standing up.

bop
Posts: 88
Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 3:26 am
Location: Alberta Canada

Re: Daimler 15 camshaft

Post by bop » Thu Jan 31, 2019 4:13 pm

The camshaft is now installed in the engine. But when I took the photos I recall it looked like a bronze insert. It was not loose and appeared permanently installed, but may have been frozen in place from sitting for 40+ years. The bearing is pressure fed from the oil pump through the main bearing then on to the cam bearing. The only thing different about this bearing area is that it has an outlet to which an external pipe to the engine is attached. This pipe delivers oil under pressure to the head to lubricate the top end. I wonder if this insert was supposed to be loose and act as wipe to boost pressure to the top end??? My thoughts when I installed the cam was that if it was supposed to be loose, then maybe when everything heated up (different metals) and with centrifugal force this would break loose. It seemed better then inflicting damage to that area trying to loosen it up.
I do like your analogy of the Daimler Board :lol:
Sometimes my curiosity is almost a curse. I spend a lot more time reverse engineering/reading on things then actually assembling them. Then the worse part yet is after a few months I forget the answer and have to reinvestigate again :D
thanks
Bob

qantasqf1
Posts: 103
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2016 10:13 pm

Re: Daimler 15 camshaft

Post by qantasqf1 » Fri Feb 01, 2019 12:01 am

Bob, according to the parts catalogue it isn’t a service part because it’s neither illustrated not has an assigned part number. If it is slightly recessed in the camshaft bearing then I would guess it would carry oil to the outlet union and thence to the rocker shaft. As it alignes only briefly with the outlet when rotating it could be simply an oil flow regulator to avoid flooding the rocker shaft. Again, only conjecture!
Steve

bop
Posts: 88
Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2016 3:26 am
Location: Alberta Canada

Re: Daimler 15 camshaft

Post by bop » Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:19 am

After chatting with Ranald on the Lanchester forum I decided to remove the cam for a more thorough look. Turns out that the insert is not an insert at all, but rather a grove lightly machined into the cam bearing surface. Although I initially cleaned the cam in Varsol, it was only after I scrubbed the area with steel wool did the stain start to disappear. So I guess this grove is to help lubricate the bearing surface.
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Another point of interest is that the cam bearing has a hole drill completely through it. This is the path the oil takes to get to the head.
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thanks Stan and Steve for the feedback. :)

Bob

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